Fort Bend County Drainage District receives $48 Million in Federal Grant Money

The US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service has granted 48 Million to the Fort Bend County Drainage District..

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The Fort Bend County Drainage District recently received $48 million in federal grant money for three of our main drainage channels, including the Willowfork of Buffalo Bayou, Cane Island & Oyster Creek.

In order to utilize the federal grant money, Fort Bend County is required to contribute a local match of 5 million dollars which has been included in the upcoming November Flood Mitigation Bond Election.

The federal dollars come from the US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and will provide major erosion control and bank stabilization for areas that have seen repeat damage from the recent years of historic flooding.

At the very top of the list is a $30.7 million, three-phase project for the Willow Fork of Buffalo Bayou which will include the installation of almost 40,000 linear feet of 5 foot-tall sheet pile walls to control erosion, and stabilize the banks, and phase 3 will also include the removal of 46,300 cubic yards of sediment.

The Cane Island channel will be divided into a two-phase project totaling about 8.3 million and along with the installation of 1,870 linear feet 5-foot-tall sheet pile walls to control erosion, and stabilize the banks, it will also include the repairing of failed ditch slopes. Those near the Oyster Creek Channel can expect an 11 Million project that will consist of 2 phases and includes the installation of 6,250 linear feet of 5-foot-tall sheet pile walls to control erosion, and stabilize the banks. All three of the projects will also include the installation of several 5 rock check dams. Check dams are used to regulate flow velocities, reduce scour erosion, and trap small quantities of sediment along higher-risk ditches and channels. They are highly effective in preventing downcutting in a ditch or channel and control erosion and growth in vegetated ditches and channels.

Special thanks goes out to our Chief Drainage Engineer Mark Vogler and Assistant Engineer Adam Wright for their tireless work on securing the funding and permitting to tackle these massive projects.

More information and project details are online via the recent recap from Jen Para at Community Impact Katy.